Imagine a place where beauty, mystery and natural wonders surround you at every turn. Where ancient ruins await to unveil their secrets, and where tradition and history are one with the earth.

Located at the crossroads of Utah, Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico, the great Navajo Nation is a land of striking contrast spanning some 27,000 square miles. Sprinkled with lakes and ponds, stunning plateaus, lush gorges and sandstone walls, it is easy to appreciate why the Navajo people have such a strong connection with the land.

Humbling you with its magnitude and enchanting you with its hidden marvels, this sacred land has been safeguarded by the Navajo Parks and Recreation Department since 1964. Dedicated to protecting, preserving and managing the tribal parks, monuments and recreation areas, this department seeks to ensure the lasting enjoyment and benefit of the Navajo Nation. In addition, the Navajo Parks and Recreation Department also strives to maintain Hozhóó, the harmonious balance between man and nature, and hopes all people will become educated and enthusiastic stewards of the land.

From the world-famous cliffs of Monument Valley, to the carved red sandstone gorges of Antelope Canyon, countless curiosities juxtapose the endless blue desert skies. Spend an afternoon taking in the finely layered upper limestone cliffs of Little Colorado River Navajo Tribal Park, or learn more about the native wildlife at the Navajo Nation Zoo and neighboring Navajo Nation Museum.

The Four Corners Monument is one of the Navajo Nation’s most unique landmarks. A popular location for movie and TV shoots; this is the only place in the United States where four states intersect at one point. Another popular attraction is Camp Asááyi located in the Bowl Canyon Navajo Recreation Area. Here, amongst the rugged terrain, clear streams and metamorphic formations, you can enjoy picnicking, hiking, canoeing, camping and fishing.

Pay homage to the many Navajos who served in the U.S military at Window Rock Navajo Tribal Park & Veteran’s Memorial. Situated at the base of the famous sandstone arch, this memorial was designed and built by the Navajo people.

Finally, Canyon de Chelly is a place where the old and new worlds collide. Dating back nearly 5,000 years, this National Monument is one of the longest continuously inhabited landscapes of North America. A must-see destination for anyone venturing to the area, tourists can explore the ruins of the early indigenous tribes, and meet the Navajo families that live there today.

Whether you’re unearthing the past at one of the many tribal parks, monuments or recreation areas, or revelling in the modern culture at events like the Annual Navajo Nation Fair, celebrate the wonders of the southwest and Travel Navajo Nation.

Find out more at navajonationparks.org